Articles From Volume - 01 (Issue - 03)

Open Access Category: JMHS Total View - 351
Intrauterine intussusception: a rare cause of ileal atresia and Hirschsprung’s disease Paper ID: JMHS-31-10-2019-151
Abstract : Intrauterine intussusception is an extremely rare cause of intestinal atresia. It may occur at late stage of pregnancy and cause impairment of blood supply to a segment of intestine leading to its resorption and atresia. Of same, the aganglionosis caused by an intrauterine vascular accident has been shown. . The coexistence of Hirschsprung's disease, intrauterine intussusception and ileal atresia has yet to be described in the literature. We reported a rare case of 2-day old newborn presented with acute bowel obstruction. An abdominal radiograph identified distended loops of bowel with no air in the rectum. An emergency surgery was performed. At laparotomy, an ileal atresia associated to ileocecal intussusception were found. Distally, there was an unused colon. A terminally anastomosing resection were performed. The child had developed a postoperative functional obstruction requiring a surgical revision. A corrective anastomsis was found with a dilated proximal small bowel and an unused colon. An ileostomy and multi-level biopsy were performed. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of total colonic Hirschsprung disease. The last surgery was performed at the age of two months. It consists of a total colonic resection and Sovae ileorectal pull-through
Full article
Open Access Category: JMHS Total View - 341
Simultaneous Occurrence of a Meckel's diverticulum and a patent urachus: A case report in infant Paper ID: JMHS-14-10-2019-136
Abstract : Meckel’s Diverticulum (MD) is a rare condition defined as a heterotopic gastric or pancreatic tissue in the small intestine, secondary to persistence of the congenital vitello-intestinal duct. It is the remnant of the yolk channel located about 60-80 cm from the ileocecal junction. Simultaneous existence of a Meckel’s Diverticulum and a patent urachus is an uncommon situation .It may be asymptomatic for long time .MD is a common anomaly of the small intestine that occurs in approximately 2% of the population, often found incidentally at the time of abdominal exploration. Complications arising from a Meckel’s diverticulum or urachal remnant may clinically mimic acute appendicitis and other surgical pathologies. We report on a patient who referred to pediatric surgery with abdominal pain and deterioration of general status. On physical examination his abdomen was distended with guarding. A diagnosis of acute peritonitis by intestine perforation was made. The patient underwent a surgery and in the course of the surgery, a urachal remnant was found to coexist with a Meckel’s diverticulum.
Full article
Back to Top