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American Journal of Food Science and Nutrition (AJFSN)

HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF SOME HEAVY METALS IN SOIL AND EDIBLE VEGETABLES IN OBANLIKU URBAN AREA OF CROSS RIVER STATE, NIGERIA.

(This article belongs to Vol - 01, Issue - 03)
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Abstract

Edible vegetable and soil samples were collected from Obanliku Urban Area of Cross River State, digested and analyzed for the cobalt (Co), Nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) concentration in them, using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (AAS) in Chemistry Laboratory, University of Calabar. The eight vegetables considered in the study were Amaranthus spp., Corchorus olitorius, Murraya koenigii, Ocimum grattissimum, Solanum melongena, Talinum triangulare, Telfaira occidentalis and Vernonia amygdalina. The results showed that the average amount of the metals in the soil in mgkg-1 ranged from (0.027-1.075) and (0.029-1.070) in rainy and dry seasons respectively for Co, (0.009-0.018) and (0.010-0.016) in rainy and dry season respectively for Pb, and (0.320-1.077) and (0.319-1.079) in rainy and dry season respectively for Zn. Also, the average amount of the metals accumulated by the vegetables in mgkg-1 ranged from (0.015-0.127) and (0.008-0.072) in rainy and dry season for Co, (0.006-0.013) and (0.005-0.010) in rainy and dry season respectively for Pb, and (0.021-0.209) and (0.019-0.207) in rainy and dry season respectively for Zn. The amount of Ni was not detected in the soil or vegetables. The average concentration accumulated by the vegetables and that present in the soil was in the order: Zn > Co > Pb > Ni. These values revealed that there is no significant difference between the concentration of metals in the soil or that accumulated by the vegetables in rainy and dry seasons of the year. Also, the amount of metals accumulated by most of the vegetables varies directly as the amount present in the soil where they are planted. The Target Hazard Quotients (THQ) was all less than 1. These results suggest that the concentration of Co, Pb, Zn & Ni in the soil and vegetables were still low and within the allowable limits of WHO/FAO. Thus, the consumption of the vegetables in the area at the time of carrying out this study may not pose any health risk.
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American Journal of Food Science and Nutrition (AJFSN) ISSN 2212-7866 Published by SDIP, London, United Kingdom.
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